Not too long ago, supporters imagined Joe Biden might be the next LBJ, and perhaps they were right — just not how they thought.

Last week, after the Supreme Court refused to block a Texas law that makes it functionally very difficult to offer abortion services in the state, people began to ponder in earnest what a post-Roe future might look like. There’s a lot of uncertainty about which states would allow abortion, a…

The primary lesson we should take from the events of Sept. 11, 2001, is to be wary of lessons we think we have learned from traumatic events. Trauma can undermine the clear thinking and calm deliberation big decisions require.

For 20 years since Sept. 11, 2001, U.S. presidents have been saying their anti-terrorism policies have worked, as evidenced by no new attacks on America. While we should be grateful another attack hasn’t occurred, past performance is no guarantee of future success. Fanatics are nothing but p…

President Joe Biden’s personal hell month featured the devastation of Hurricane Ida, our country’s dreadful withdrawal from Afghanistan, mounting deaths from Covid-19’s Delta variant, overcrowded ICUs, a dragging economy, many schools opening and some nearly closing down, and uncontrollable …

A day after the Constitution-flouting Texas anti-abortion law went into effect, a divided Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday that it won’t block the law before it can grapple with a concrete case that tests it in practice. The five most conservative justices agreed to an unsigned, one-and-a-ha…

It is difficult to claim that the Biden administration’s panicky, slapdash, humiliating exit from Afghanistan — dependent on the kindness of the Taliban and commemorated by indelible images of chaos and betrayal — is really the best we could do. This requires a Trumpian level of sycophantic …

Many, including me, have noted the corrosive effect of social media on institutions. The mystery is why so many institutions have so passively allowed this to happen.

If you worked at the White House, what was the first item on your agenda on Monday morning? The dangerous final hours of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, with terrorists seeking every opportunity to attack our troops as they depart? The devastation wrought by Hurricane Ida, one of the m…

For nearly two years, Americans have engaged in a great woke experiment of cannibalizing themselves. American civilization has invested massive labor, capital and time in an effort to constantly flagellate itself for not being perfect.

WASHINGTON — Warren Buffett famously remarked that “Only when the tide goes out do you discover who’s been swimming naked.” Of course, Buffett was talking about his industry — the quacks and frauds who surf the surging boom market, only to get beached when the waves of easy money recede. But…

President Joe Biden’s disastrous withdrawal from Afghanistan has been compared with the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam. But in the wake of Thursday’s suicide bombing at the Kabul airport, what we are seeing in Afghanistan is far worse than a repeat of Saigon, 1975; it is now a repeat of Beirut, 1983.

The U.S. is getting out of Afghanistan, but it is unlikely to get out — and stay out — of the Middle East. For the past decade, three presidents have tried to downsize the American presence in the region; for generations, the Middle East has been a strategic morass. But the U.S. seems stuck …

Whatever you think of mask mandates in schools, the Republican governors who stepped in to ban them are making a big mistake. Majorities of the public oppose these bans, and although they are popular with the Republican base — barely — few Republicans actually favor the harsh measures necess…

One of my great concerns about the pandemic was that it would hinder the global mobility of people and labor, perhaps permanently. Unfortunately, my worst fears are being realized: As Covid-19 mutates, it is affecting not only tourism and business travel but also migration more generally.

Bring on the vaccination mandates! If reason, patriotism and clear self-interest won’t convince reluctant Americans to protect themselves and their communities against Covid-19, maybe the threat of not being able to work, go to school or lead anything like a normal life will do the trick.

As the Taliban reconquers Afghanistan in the wake of the U.S. withdrawal, the U.S. has a moral obligation to allow in refugees. Many Afghans worked for the U.S. during the occupation, often risking their lives to do so; they’ve earned the right to a safe home in the country they chose to sup…

Maybe the horror was always inevitable. Maybe the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan could end only one way: with U.S. military planes lofting away as the hands of desperate Afghans were ripped free and bodies plummeted toward the people we’d left behind on the tarmac. Maybe this became inexorable…

As the Taliban seize control of Kabul and indeed all of Afghanistan, it is worth pondering the less obvious lessons of this 20-year episode. It is a reminder of why I cannot bring myself to be a foreign policy hawk, even though I largely accept the hawks’ worldview and underlying values.

Many of us not naturally inclined to support a Democratic president have developed a rooting interest in Joe Biden’s political success. This is not mainly due to Biden’s skills or vision; it’s because he is fighting a rear-guard action to save political rationality.

Is a president of the United States flagrantly defying the Constitution an authoritarian act? A threat to democracy? Something that at least should be discouraged or frowned upon?

As the Delta variant of Covid-19 spreads, many parents are worried that their public schools will not fully reopen this fall. That would be a serious unforced error — and the mere possibility of it is evidence that America is not thinking rationally about risk.

Joe Biden may have humanitarian motives for extending the Centers for Disease Control eviction ban that the Supreme Court has already deemed unlawful. But it is both bad constitutional law and bad constitutional politics to flout the court’s judgment — especially because Justice Brett Kavana…

As with everything else Covid-related, vaccine passports were a political flash point even before New York City announced Tuesday that it would mandate proof of vaccination for many indoor settings. Liberals are enthusiastic, while conservatives have variously derided them as “Jim Crow,” “au…

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Teddy Roosevelt fervently believed that the president of the United States should be at the center of the political universe, constantly attracting attention to himself. But he’d never met Joe Biden.

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