10 YEARS AGO

July 12, 2011 — ANCHORAGE — Two small planes collided in midair along a narrow and treacherous mountain corridor in a crash that marked an extraordinarily rare event: No one was injured. “It is extremely unusual,” Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Mike Fergus said Monday. “It is almost unheard of.”

The near-tragedy occurred Sunday afternoon as a Piper Navajo and Cessna 206 floatplane were flying directly toward each other in Lake Clark Pass — a narrow river valley that runs between Anchorage mountains.

 

25 YEARS AGO

July 12, 1996 — Harold Skelton was nervous as he stepped up to the microphone Thursday evening to defend the hiring practices of Osborne/TIC Joint Venture, lead construction contractor on the Fort Knox gold mine project about 15 miles northeast of Fairbanks.

“I feel like bait in a shark tank right now,” said Skelton, Fort Knox senior project manager, speaking against a resolution before the Fairbanks North Star Borough Assembly condemning the alleged shortage of Alaskans on his company’s payroll.

 

50 YEARS AGO

July 12, 1971 — A power outage in the Municipal Utilities System occurred about 9 a.m. this morning when a garbage truck hit a power pole at Steese and Minnie Streets. MUS General Manager Jim Movius said the outage affected all of the MUS system north of the Chena River.

That area includes StaterviUe, Gnehl, the Railroad Industrial Area and the Pay ‘n Save-Market Basket shopping area. Hamilton Acres is not in the MUS system, and was unaffected. 

 

75 YEARS AGO

July 12, 1946 — SEATTLE — Pilferage of Alaska-bound cargo on shps and docks has reached such proportions, shipping officials said today, that it has caused shortages in Alaskan cities.

“It’s pitiful the way pilfering is going on and the apparent lack of ability to stop it,” said L. W. Baker, general manager of the Northland Transfortation Company, and S. J. Swanson, vice president of the Alaska Transportation Company, agreed in interviews that pilferage of cargo was causing shortages in Alaska, espeically in clothing and scarce food items.