Michael E. Krauss Alaska Native Language Archive

Professor Emeritus Michael Krauss, second from right, listens as Walkie Charles, Chair of Gov. Sean Parnell's newly appointed Language Preservation and Advisory Council introduces the council members during the Michael E. Krauss Alaska Native Language Archive dedication ceremony Friday evening, February 22, 2013 in the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The archives, located on the second level of the library, were renamed in honor of Krauss, a UAF professor emeritus whose support for the documentation of Alaska Native languages has led to the ANLA becoming one of the premier repositories for indigenous language materials in the world. "I'm, of course, overwhelmed and humbled by the scope of this event," Krauss said while speaking to the large crowd of attendees at the dedication ceremony. Krauss's contributions to Alaska Native languages include the founding of the Alaska Native Language Center in 1972, the creation of the first modern language map of Alaska in 1974, the documentation of the Eyak language and the co-editing of a bibliographic catalog for ANLA. The archive, which was started by Krauss in 1960 and houses the collections of language and cultural documentation from the UAF Alaska Native Language Center and from other researchers across the globe, includes more than 15,000 documents and more than 5,000 recordings. In 2009, the archive was established as a distinct entity, allowing a renewed focus on digital preservation and access, while at the same time serving as a repository for the growing body of educational materials being developed by Alaska Native speakers and linguists at the ANLC. Guests and speakers on hand included Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell, Alaska Native Language Center director Lawrence Kaplan, Chair of the Alaska Native Preservation and Advisory Council Walkie Charles, and Athabascan Elder Robert Charlie.