UAF Arctic Research Open House

Kimberly Clark, a visitor at UAF's Arctic Research Open House, checks out some permafrost in virtual reality while Margaret Rudolf, a scientist with the university, supervises. The public event comprised researchers in climate science, natural resources, geoscience, engineering and social science, according to the center.

UAF Arctic Research Open House

Kelsey Gordon (right), program coordinator for One Health at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, explains to the visitors for UAF's Arctic Research Open House that the puppies they're holding don't have names. The black Alaskan husky is a female, while the white one is a male, both from Pile Driver Kennel. These dogs are working to be sprint dogs and the One Health Program, which looks into animal, environmental and human health, will be able to study them as they grow up. Kyrie Long/News-Miner

The University of Alaska Fairbanks held an Arctic Research Open House at the West Ridge portion of campus on Thursday. Visitors could meet reindeer from the university's captive reindeer herd, learn about permafrost, play with models and check out the university's virtual campus, all with scientists on site.  From the Arctic Health Building, where people could play with puppies, learn about northern fur seals and get gardening information, to virtual reality demonstrations in the Akasofu Building: There was a display of UAF research all afternoon.
 
UAF Arctic Research Open House

Student and Ph.D candidate in environmental chemistry, Kristin Gagne, describes how the permafrost she's holding is much lighter than it looks because it's mostly made up of plants close to the surface, rather than the silty layers of permafrost from deeper in the earth. This permafrost core is from the surface of a berry bog. Gagne works with the College of Natural Science and Mathematics at UAF, and came to the Arctic Research Open House to display how different instruments from the instrumentation laboratory can be used. Kyrie Long/News-Miner