• Feb. 11, 1984: Cox was born Francis August Schaeffer Cox, and goes by Schaeffer Cox. Cox moved to Alaska from Colorado about 2000.

• May 2003: Cox received a high school diploma through the Nenana correspondence program CyberLynx. He briefly attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Instead of studying business, he decided to start one, he said in a later political campaign.

He opened a construction and landscaping operation.

• August 2008: Cox challenged Rep. Mike Kelly in the Republican primary for House District 7. Cox received 37 percent of the vote to Kelly’s 50 percent. Cox also led the Ron Paul presidential primary campaign in Alaska.

• February 2009: Cox started the Second Amendment Task Force, a gun rights group that held several meetings in 2009. About 150 people attended an initial meeting at Denny’s Restaurant. Larger meetings were held at Friends Community Church and the Carlson Center. Also beginning in February, Cox organized several open-carry days to protest gun control legislation in Washington. An open-carry day at Carl’s Jr. was attended by U.S. Rep. Don Young.

• Later in 2009: Cox founded a group called the Alaska Peacemakers Militia. Cox said this group was created to check governmental power and create stability if the U.S. government collapsed. Cox said the Peacemakers Militia had 3,500 members, though it never made a full list available. Cox said many members prefer a low profile.

• March 5, 2010: Cox pleaded guilty to reckless endangerment and was sentenced to two years’ probation for allegedly punching and choking his wife during a car ride to visit his mother-in-law in Anchorage. Cox said he only pushed her during the argument.

• March 17, 2010: Cox was arrested and charged with fifth-degree weapons misconduct for allegedly not informing a Fairbanks police officer that he, Cox, was carrying a concealed handgun. Cox was monitoring a police search of a residence as a member of the Liberty Bell Network, a group Cox organized. Members of the group would send a mass notification to other network members if they felt their rights were being violated. Network members would show up with cameras to document the alleged violations. Police said they were responding to a 911 hang-up call at the house where Cox was subsequently arrested. His supporters said there was no 911 call.

• Jan. 16, 2011: A trial for Cox, organized outside the Alaska court system, was held in a back room at Denny’s Restaurant. The group acquitted Cox of the March 2010 weapons misconduct and the March 2010 domestic violence charges. Cox has declared himself a sovereign citizen and not subject to the laws of the nation.

• Feb. 4-6, 2011: Cox’s militia associates attended a militia convention in Anchorage to investigate buying grenades and other illegal weapons, according to the FBI, which had been monitoring Cox for at least 10 months. Cox stayed home because his wife was giving birth to their second child.

• Feb. 12, 2011: According to the FBI, Cox announced a murder plot called “2-4-1” (two-for-one) to four members of his Peacemakers Militia. Militia members would kidnap two law enforcement officers if Cox or other militia members were arrested. Two targets were to be killed if Cox was killed, and two government buildings were to be burned if Cox’s house was seized, according to the investigation.

• Feb. 14, 2011: A warrant was issued for Cox’s arrest after he did not show up at his jury trial on the misdemeanor weapons charge.

• March 10, 2011: FBI, U.S. marshals and Alaska State Troopers arrived at militia members’ homes in Fairbanks, the North Pole area, Salcha and the Elliott Highway. Cox and four militia members were arrested on state charges, including conspiracy to commit murder. Cox also faced federal weapons charges. Two co-defendants, Lonnie Vernon and Karen Vernon, of Salcha, were accused of a separate plot in federal court to allegedly kill a federal judge, members of his family and an IRS agent.

• Oct. 17, 2011: A state judge banned the use of more than 100 hours of electronic surveillance in the murder conspiracy case, costing prosecutors a large quantity of evidence against Cox.

• Oct. 28, 2011: The state of Alaska dismissed all charges against the five defendants in the murder conspiracy case and released one from jail. Federal charges against the other four defendants, including Cox, remained in place. The dismissals followed a court ruling that keeps prosecutors from using secret FBI recordings as evidence.

• Jan. 23, 2012: Cox and two others again faced murder conspiracy charges, this time from federal prosecutors, who said the three had a plan as far back as 2009 to kill federal officials, including Transportation Security Administration employees, border patrol agents and U.S. marshals.

• May 8: An Anchorage jury of seven men and nine women heard opening arguments in the case against Cox, Coleman Barney and Lonnie Vernon.

• June 13: Closing arguments were made.

• June 18: The jury convicted Cox and Lonnie Vernon of conspiracy to commit murder. It was unable to reach a decision on this charge for Coleman Barney, but convicted him of owning illegal weapons. Barney later was sentenced to serve five years.

• July: Nelson Traverso withdrew as Cox’s attorney, citing his client’s dissatisfaction with his performance at trial. Cox hired Seattle attorney Peter Camiel.

• Aug. 27: Lonnie and Karen Vernon pleaded guilty in a separate case to planning to kill a federal judge and an IRS employee in retribution for the government’s handling of a tax dispute.

• Monday: Lonnie Vernon was sentenced to 26 years in prison. Karen Vernon was sentenced to serve 12 years.

• Tuesday: Cox was sentenced to 310 months, almost 26 years, in prison. At sentencing, his attorney said Cox suffers from several paranoid disorders, a defense Cox did not use during his jury trial.